North Carolina State University - Department Of Genetics

The Program in Genetics consists of a highly interactive group of scientists with foci in quantitative, developmental and computational genetics. The program also administers outstanding undergraduate and graduate training programs in genetics, partly supported by an NIH training grant on 'The Genetic Architecture of Quantitative Traits'.

Program in Genetics

Undergraduate

October 29th, 2011

Postdoctoral Scholar Michelle DeSimone wins Best New Investigator Award Dr. Michelle DeSimone, a postdoctoral scholar in the Threadgill Laboratory, wins the Environmental Mutagen Society's Best New Investigator Award. Dr. DeSimone was recognized at the 42nd Annual Meeting of the Environmental Mutagen Society in Montreal, Canada. Her presentation “A population-level genetic model of low dose co-exposure reveals a genetic basis for increased cancer susceptibility” was selected from over 85 presentations by new investigators.

Dr. Michelle DeSimone, a postdoctoral scholar in the Threadgill Laboratory, won the Environmental Mutagen Society's Best New Investigator Award at the 42nd Annual Meeting of the Environmental Mutagen Society in Montreal, Canada.  Her presentation “A population-level genetic model of low dose co-exposure reveals a genetic basis for increased cancer susceptibility” was selected from over 85 presentations by new investigators. Dr. DeSimone earned a PhD from the Curriculum in Toxicology at the University of North Carolina before joining the Threadgill Lab. She previously won the 2011 Syngenta Fellowship Award for the trainee project most like to have an impact on understanding human xenobiotic exposures at the 50th Annual Meeting of the Society of Toxicology in Washington, DC. Dr. DeSimone's research project is focused on developing a new paradigm for toxicological exposure analysis that uses an innovative genetically heterogeneous population of mice to model and investigate disease outcomes from tricholoroethylene and arsenic co-expsoure in humans. These two chemicals are found in many localities across North Carolina and have been associated with increased susceptibility to a variety of diseases.

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Program in Genetics
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N.C. State University
Raleigh, NC 27695-7614